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Ferrari F1 2006 Carbon Brake Disc Clock ***AUTOGRAPHED***

  • $ 10,000.00


  

This one of a kind wall clock featuring an authentic race used carbon brake disc removed directly from Ferrari's 2006 248 F1 Racecar.  At the end of the 2006 season, it was signed by Michael Schumacher (Driver), Jean Todt (Executive Director Scuderia Ferrari) and Luca Cordero Di Montezemolo (CEO Ferrari).  It was mounted to a 18"x18" carbon wall plaque with an authentic Ferrari fender shield mounted in the middle.  The center was drilled to allow clock hands to be installed (white outline hour and minute hands, red solid second hand) and sweep just over the surface of the rotor.

 

The 248 F1 was used by Ferrari in every race of the 2006 season, unlike in other recent seasons (2002, 2003 and 2005), in which the team had used the previous year's car at the start of the season, while developing a new car.

 

The car performed well in qualifying at the season opener, the Bahrain Grand Prix, with an all Ferrari front row. At the United States Grand Prix, in Indianapolis, Ferrari were dominant all weekend, resulting in the first Ferrari one-two finish since the same race 12 months beforehand. This seemed to represent a genuine turning point for the car's competitiveness. Modifications throughout the season continued to improved the car's performance, to the point where it was considered the fastest package of all for the remainder of the season - the car won 7 of the last 9 races of the season.

 

Overall, the car gave Ferrari 9 race wins and 4 pole positions, and second place finished in both the Drivers' and Constructors' World Championships. In addition, it was the last car that seven-time World Champion Michael Schumacher raced in a Formula One season.

This race piece was designed to celebrate this victory and is set on a special carbon fiber base with detailed metal nameplate.  The clock is a quartz movement that has a sweeping second hand in red with the hour and minute hands in brushed stainless steel.  The mechanics are discretely hidden by a carbon fiber disc.  The clock runs on a AA battery and can be accessed from the rear of the plaque. 



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